SS #28 Pardee Symposium: The Next Generation of Geoscience Leaders: Strategies For Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion, convened by Dr. Raquel Bryant and Dr. Benjamin Keisling

https://community.geosociety.org/gsa2020/program/technical/pardee

Salutation: This symposium was inspiring and up lifting. As a POC in the geosciences, it’s easy to feel excluded from the discipline. This Symposium/Workshop not only provided me with the tools to develop my own DEI initiatives at my institution, but also left me feeling inspired and hopeful about the future of geosciences and their leaders.

What was awesome? It was helpful! I couldn’t stop thinking about it! It’s a scientific frontier!

From Jessica McKay, Texas A&M

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SS #27 Sediment availability provokes a shift from Brownian to Lévy‐like clonal expansion in a dune building grass, by Valérie C. Reijers et al.

Salutation: The paper title says it all — it’s so cool that lateral expansion of coastal dune plants is so tightly coupled to deposition.

What was awesome? It was surprising! I couldn’t stop thinking about it! It’s a scientific frontier! It made a key connection for me!

From Evan Goldstein, UNC Greensboro

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SS #26 Ronneberger et al. (2015) U-Net: Convolutional Networks for Biomedical Image Segmentation

Salutation: This paper presented the U-Net convolutional network technique, which was the foundation for my project’s major accomplishments this year, even though it was published in 2015 and is in a separate field (yay for applying techniques developed in the biomedical field to geology!). The U-Net convolutional network approach has proven extremely useful for training algorithms to detect a number of different geological features (e.g., geobodies, faults, horizons) from imagery (e.g., seismic).

What was awesome? It was helpful! It’s a scientific frontier! It’s a key technological development!

From: anonymous.

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SS #25 McLachlan et al. Impacts of tidal-channel connectivity on transport asymmetry and sediment exchange with mangrove forests

Salutation: This manuscript eloquently brought new students in my lab up to speed on the nature of some of the problems we are studying elsewhere. I found the data presentation to be clear and intuitive, and have attempted versions of similar figures in my ongoing work.

What was awesome? There were excellent figures and documentation! It was helpful!

From Rip Hale, Old Dominion U.

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SS #24 Downstream changes in river avulsion style are related to channel morphology

Salutation: Great work giving me insight into spatial variations in channel avulsion style as related to morphology. Potentially helpful for better understanding avulsion record and future hazard.

What was awesome? I was surprising!

From: Anonymous

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SS #23 Global Grids of Ice Sheet Thickness and Paleotopography for 21,000 – present day, by W.R. Peltier

Salutation: Even though the ICE-5G model was published in 2004, I only found the data in Feb 2020 when searching for the ice mask generated by the ice sheet model for the LGM, which was instrumental in the development of the TraCE-21Ka global paleo-climate model. Both models produced data sets that have allowed me to make progress in my erosion modeling work. I am thankful for the data, the models, and that there is a repository with information on the data files and the model versions as they develop.

What was awesome? It was helpful! It is ground-breaking!

From: Risa Madoff

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SS #22 Viles (2020) Biogeomorphology: Past, present and future

Salutation: I come from the field of quantitative geomorphology and this paper opened up a new way to look at surface processes.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X19302752

What was awesome? It was helpful! I couldn’t stop thinking about it!

From: Michal Ben-Israel, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

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SS #21 Barra (2020) Good Sediment: Race and Resoration in Coastal Louisiana

Salutation: As a coastal sedimentologist, I have long felt that I am part of an effort to restore deltas through large scale delta engineering that is intrinsically good. This paper shows that for powerless groups on the Mississippi Delta, coastal engineering has meant continual disruption. It’s forced me to think carefully about who benefits from my work. It also led to an introspective group meeting.

What was awesome? I couldn’t stop thinking about it!

From: John Shaw, University of Arkansas

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SS#20 Judy Yang et al. 2020 4D imaging reveals mechanisms of clay-carbon protection and release

Salutation: The beautiful microscopic experimentation reveals the surprising mechanisms of soil carbon storage and release.

What was awesome? It was surprising! I couldn’t stop thinking about it! It’s a scientific frontier!

https://www.researchsquare.com/article/rs-54393/v1

From: Hongbo Ma, University of Arkansas

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SS#19 Thran et al. (2018) Controls on the global distribution of contourite drifts

Salutation: I’m a huge fan of studies that provide a global perspective of an Earth-system phenomenon and this one, on the relationship of contourite deposits to results of oceanographic modeling, is a fantastic example. It’s very clearly written and made me immediately want to look at my own data and revisit some vague ideas. Anyone interested in using contourite drifts as paleocirculation records should read this.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0012821X18301067

What was awesome? I couldn’t stop thinking about it! It made a key connection for me!

From: Brian Romans, Virginia Tech

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